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7324 15th Ave NW

Seattle, WA 98117

206-588-1249

info@PurpleAcu.com

www.PurpleAcu.com

Massage

May the healing begin

candlelight-vigilCandlelight Vigil

Join us this evening, Friday Nov.11th, 7-9pm
near the Greenlake Bathhouse Theater

Informal gathering of neighbors for healing and
fellowship. We’ll provide white candles. No need to bring your own candle unless you wish.

Self-healing you can do at home…

1. I enjoy softly listening to this soothing musical mantra for healing. “Om tare tutarre ture svaha” can protect our minds from negative thoughts and vibrations, and it awakens our inner compassion.

2. A very easy way to calm your mind and emotions is the acupressure technique of massaging your ears to stimulate hundreds of acupoints on the ear that represent the entire body. Place your thumb on backside of ear and your index finger on frontside, as though you’re pinching your ear but massage in circular motion. Move around the entire front and back surfaces of both ears for 1-2 minutes. They will soon feel warm, and your mind will relax. You may do this during the day when you’re stressed or at night to help you sleep.

3. Try one Random Act of Kindness each day. It could be as simple as complimenting a stranger on something you admire about them, such as their jacket or necklace. Or pay double for your coffee and ask the barista to use the extra to buy a coffee for the next person in line. Something I love to do is carry Andes chocolate mints or Hershey chocolate kisses in my purse and give them to people I encounter during the day — for no reason at all — cashiers, someone next to me in a checkout line or crosswalk, a friend, etc. It brightens their day and their sudden smile brightens mine. Click here for other suggestions.

4. Listen to a purring cat

 

I wish you peace. — Linda

Heart Healthy Tips to Reduce Stress

In this fast-paced world we find it’s pretty hard to slow down. Everyday stressors are the norm and although some stress is good, too much can hurt the body not only mentally but physically as well. Work, family, finances and everything in between can start to take a toll on your health. Below are tips that not only help to reduce stress but are good for heart health as well.

Exercise

Not only is exercise a good way to relieve stress, but is great for strengthening the heart as well. Try getting some sort of physical activity for at least 30 minutes a day. Focus on activities that get your heart pumping. Exercise will reduce your stress and improve your overall health short term and long term. continue reading »

7 Healthy Tips for Coping with Financial Stress

beach-stress-freeIf you feel stressed just living your life, you’re not alone.

Americans lead stressful lives.  Jobs, relationships, health, family obligations, community responsibilities—they all take their toll.

In “Stress in America 2012,” an annual survey by the American Psychology Association, 1 in 5 respondents reported an extreme stress level of 8, 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale.  In that same group 69% of respondents reported physical or non-physical symptoms of stress, including irritability or anger, fatigue, feeling overwhelmed or changes in their sleep.

The top source of stress according to 69% of the respondents is–money. continue reading »

Purple Dragon Welcomes Acupuncturist Manu Saxena

Man Saxena, LAc, EAMPOur newest staff member, Manu Saxena, LAc, EAMP, is taking over the Wednesday afternoon shift 1:00-4:00 so that we can add more evening hours to our clinic. Linda now works Wednesday evenings 4:00-8:00. Since Wednesday is also $5 Acu Happy Hour day, why not drop in for a mini tune-up and meet Manu!

Manu has been a friend of Purple Dragon for sometime. He is a member of the Seattle Community Acupuncture Network (SCAN), and has plenty of experience working in community acupuncture. He is a fine practitioner who has a gentle touch. Manu is well versed in three different styles of acupuncture: traditional Chinese acupuncture, Manaka-style acupuncture (a Japanese style of acupuncture), and Toyohari Meridian-style acupuncture. In addition, Manu has experience with craniosacral therapy and various massage techniques, including Shiatsu and Chinese Tuina, is a Reiki master, and has training in Richard Bartlett’s unique healing method of Matrix Energetics. He specializes in helping people enhance their health with Chinese medicine; individuals with painful musculoskeletal disorders, allergies, emotional challenges like anxiety and depression, and in particular children, are frequent clients. Read more about Manu here.

We wish Christina Williams all the best in her new adventures. It was wonderful to have her working as acupuncturist and massage therapist at Purple Dragon this past year, and we’ll miss her. In fact, it will take 2 people to replace her! Stay tuned for news about our new massage therapist Becky Yawman.

9 Natural Ways to Prevent the Flu

The flu is especially widespread this year. We know you want to stay well. In addition to offering acupuncture to strengthen your immune system to help prevent flu, we here at Purple Dragon will share with you these 9 helpful tips from Deirdre Imus, author and environmental health advocate. This is her article “9 Natural Ways to Prevent the Flu This Winter”:

With the holiday spirit come and gone and 2013 already entering its third week, there’s only one winter milestone left to hit before we plod our way into spring: flu season.

Chances are many of you have already been feeling the flu’s nasty effects. And experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that the country’s early flu season has not yet reached its peak.

Whether you’ve received your flu shot or not, there are some natural steps we can all take to ward off influenza and to protect our loved ones from the fever, cough, achiness, and general unpleasantness associated with this nasty bug.

1. Wash your hands
One of the most effective and easiest methods of flu prevention is something we should all do several times a day–simply because it’s good manners. Do it after you use the restroom, of course, but also after you’ve shaken someone’s hand, kissed hello, been on public transportation, attended a party, gone to the gym, and many other situations. You can never be too careful, especially this time of year.

2. Stay hydrated
Staying hydrated is important in every season, but it is particularly useful in the winter. It’s easy to forget to drink enough water in the cold weather, as we’re not sweating as much as we do when it’s warmer outside. Steadily drinking six to eight glasses of water a day can boost your immune system, keeping your body strong and ready to fight off illnesses all year round.

3. Exercise
Like water, exercise has immune-boosting effects. It also enhances circulation, reduces stress, and offers another mode of eliminating toxins through perspiration, according to naturopathic doctor Amy Rothenberg. Of course, take care not to overdo it. If you’re really sick, get plenty of rest and consult a medical professional before engaging in any physical activities.

4. Eat an organic, plant-based diet
Increase the amount of organic fruits and vegetables in your diet, particularly those high in vitamin C, such as papaya, bell peppers, strawberries, broccoli, and kale. To be safe, you can also take a vitamin C supplement. I recommend camu camu, a plant-derived antioxidant vitamin that is considered a top source of vitamin C.

5. Take a vitamin D supplement
Have your vitamin D levels checked with a simple blood test from your physician. If they’re low, consider taking a vitamin D supplement to help prevent not only the flu, but also a host of other health conditions–like cancer and cardiovascular disease–that have been linked to vitamin D deficiency.

6. Enlist probiotics
As discussed in my Green Your Tummy blog, these so-called “good bacteria” in your gut have been shown to help fend off colds and the flu and can rebalance the bacteria we need in our bodies that can be destroyed by antibiotics. Probiotics come in pill form, and a typical dosage is in the billions of CF units, but you can also introduce probiotics into your diet through yogurt, miso, tempeh, kimchi, coconut kefir, and sauerkraut.

7. Try elderberry
Elderberry syrup is not only packed with vitamins A, B, and C, but it also stimulates the immune system, has been shown to prevent colds and the flu, and tastes delicious. At The Imus Ranch, we make elderberry syrup from scratch, but you can find a bottle at your local natural foods market. If you feel a tickle in your throat, soothe it with some elderberry tea.

8. Use essential oils
Essential oils are restorative, curative, and natural antibacterial agents. They also happen to smell pretty great. Diffuse grade-A essential oils throughout your home, or apply them topically to your skin. Apply some oregano oil to your back, chest, and the bottoms of your feet. Aside from being a natural antibiotic, it also has bacteria-fighting properties and is a powerful antihistamine.

9. Get your omega-3s
Rather than turn to fish oil for your health-promoting omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants, consider going right to the source and using marine phytoplankton instead. It’s where fish get their omega-3, 6, and 9 fatty acids, as well as their vitamin A. You can enjoy the benefits by simply adding 10 to 15 drops into your water or juice.

If you find yourself getting sick every winter, it’s important to change your habits, and not continue doing what you’ve always done.

The best defense is a good offense, right? This year, take control of your health and start warding off the flu before it rears its ugly head. Beef up your immune system, be kind to yourself, and protect the littlest and most fragile members of your family.

Photo above is from Huffington Post.

Chinese lunar New Year: A do-over for your New Year’s resolutions

It’s about almost month into the New Year. Do you already wish you had a do-over for your New Year’s Resolutions?

If so, you’re in luck.  You do.

February 10th is the Chinese lunar New Year.  The celebration of the New Year, the Spring Festival, is China’s longest and most important holiday.  Because it is based on a different calendar, it falls on a different date between January 21 and February 20 every year.  You can think of Spring Festival as Christmas and New Year all rolled into one.  Just like our holiday season, it’s a time of celebration, visiting family and friends, giving gifts and preparing for the next year.

Chinese Lunar New Year:   Spring Festival

In China, there are many New Year’s traditions during the 15-day Spring Festival.  Many people clean their homes to sweep away the past year and usher in the next.  Oftentimes family members travel home for a visit.  Children receive red envelopes, called hóngbāo in Mandarin, filled with money from their relatives. People hang red lanterns outside their homes to bring happiness and good luck.  On Chinese New Year’s Eve families gather for a huge meal and enjoy “lucky” foods together.  And, of course, there are fireworks.

The Chinese zodiac has 12 years in its cycle, each one represented by an animal; 2013 is the Year of the Snake.  Astrologers say that people born in the Year of the Snake are wise but enigmatic.  They are very intuitive and size up situations well, but say little.  Snakes are refined; they like to dress well and are usually financially secure. They are intense and passionate in relationships, but can become jealous and suspicious.  Snakes prefer a calm, stress-free environment.

Recommit to Your New Year’s Resolutions

The Chinese do not traditionally make New Year’s Resolutions like we do in the West, however this is a good time to reflect on the goals you set a month ago. Are you keeping your New Year’s resolutions?

If you’re having trouble, maybe it’s time to take a lesson from the Snakes.  Take a quiet moment and reflect on what is stopping you.  Do you need to get serious?  Do you need additional support?  Are your goals genuine—do you want to do them or do you think you should do them?  Why haven’t you kept your New Year’s Resolutions?

If your resolutions include improving your health in 2013, we here at Purple Dragon Healing Arts can help you with that.  Give us a call (or click the orange “appointment” button to the right) to arrange an appointment for anything from a tune-up to weight control to mood balancing.

If you need to make a deeper commitment to your resolutions, take a moment and think about what you need to do to keep them.  Write down 3 easy action steps.

…and do them.  Now.

Use the Chinese lunar New Year as a do-over.  Commit to your New Year’s resolutions.

Gōng Xǐ Fā Cái.  Happy New Year.

Photo credit: Gayle Nicholson / Foter / CC BY-SA

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